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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 133-134

Distribution of ABO and rhesus blood groups among pregnant Bauri women in Bankura district of West Bengal


1 Department of Pathology, Bankura Sammilani Medical College and Hospital, Bankura, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Bio-Medical Laboratory Science and Management, (U.G.C. Innovative Funded Department), Vidyasagar University; Rural Research Institute of Physiology and Applied Nutrition (RRIPAN), 'Gitanjali', Dr. Nilay Paul Road, Midnapore, West Bengal, India
3 Department of Surgery, Bankura Sammilani Medical College and Hospital, Bankura, West Bengal, India

Date of Web Publication27-Sep-2012

Correspondence Address:
Shyamapada Paul
Rural Research Institute of Physiology and Applied Nutrition (RRIPAN), 'Gitanjali', Dr. Nilay Paul Road, Midnapore 721 101, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2278-344X.101725

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How to cite this article:
Mondal B, Maiti S, Maity B, Ghosh D, Paul S. Distribution of ABO and rhesus blood groups among pregnant Bauri women in Bankura district of West Bengal. Int J Health Allied Sci 2012;1:133-4

How to cite this URL:
Mondal B, Maiti S, Maity B, Ghosh D, Paul S. Distribution of ABO and rhesus blood groups among pregnant Bauri women in Bankura district of West Bengal. Int J Health Allied Sci [serial online] 2012 [cited 2019 Sep 20];1:133-4. Available from: http://www.ijhas.in/text.asp?2012/1/2/133/101725

Sir,

Classification of blood into groups is based on the presence or absence of inherited antigenic substances on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs). Blood groups are genetically determined and exhibit polymorphism in different populations. [1] ABO blood groups are the most investigated blood group system, and they have been used as genetic markers of populations. [1],[2] It is well established that ABO blood groups vary widely both within and among ethnic groups and across the geographical boundaries. [2] The blood group distribution in different groups of population is important in health care and blood transfusion. [1],[2]

The relevance of having knowledge about the blood group systems among different ethnic groups in any population is enormous. The types of information obtained from the findings are useful for genetic information, genetic counseling, medical diagnosis, general and physiological wellbeing of individuals in a population. [2] It is, therefore, imperative to have information on the distribution of these blood groups in any population group that comprise different ethnic groups.

In India, few studies have been carried out on the distribution of blood groups in various endogamous populations [2],[3] but dearth of data in West Bengal. [4] This study was, therefore, designed to provide the information on the distribution of ABO and Rh blood groups among the Bauri pregnant women of Bankura, West Bangal.

The Bauris are a comparatively well-known sizeable caste group in West Bengal. The total Bauri population in West Bengal is 1,091,022 constituting 5.9% of the total scheduled caste population of the state. Bauri is a cultivating, earth-working, and palanquin-bearing caste, whose features and complexion suggest that they may be of non-Aryan descent. Bauris profess to be Hindus of the Sakta sect, but in Western Bengal, at any rate, their connection with Hinduism is of the slenderest kind, and their favourite objects of worship are Manasa, Bhadu, Mansingh, Barpahari, Dharmaraj, and Kudrasini. The socioeconomic status and the literacy rate of Bauris are very low. [5]

Pregnant Bauri women attending the Bankura Sammilani Medical College and Hospital (BSMCH) formed the study population. During the period between June 2010 and August 2010, 246 blood samples were studied. ABO and Rh blood groupings of the subjects were carried out by standard tile techniques with appropriate positive and negative controls using one drop of whole blood mixed with one drop of appropriate anti-sera and rocked gently. The used anti-sera were obtained from Tulip Diagnostics Pvt. Ltd., Goa (India). In case of doubt, the test was examined under a microscope, or the results were confirmed by reverse grouping using known group A and B red cells. [6] Data on the frequency of ABO and Rh-D blood groups were reported in simple percentages.

The distribution of the ABO and Rh blood groups among the Bauri population of Bankura district is depicted in [Table 1]. The most frequently occurring blood group in Bauri population was B (37.4%), followed by blood group O (29.67%) and A (23.58%). While group AB was the least encountered phenotype with a frequency of < 10% among the samples studied. The phenotypic frequencies with respect to ABO system in the present study can be shown as B > O > A > AB. The prevalence of the ABO phenotypes linked with Rh phenotype was B± (36.18%), followed by O± (29.27%), A± (22.76%), and AB± (8.94%). The lowest prevalence was that of AB-(0.004%).
Table 1: Distribution of ABO and rhesus blood groups among pregnant Bauri women (n = 246)

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Distribution of ABO and Rh(D) blood groups among Lodha tribe in Midnapore district of West Bengal was analysed and it was observed that incidence of group A was maximum and incidence of group AB was minimum; 99.5% of the subjects were 'Rh' positive. [4] However, in a study on the distribution of ABO and Rh among the Brahmin and Kushwaha populations of Jhansi Uttar Pradesh the prevalence recorded is O >B > A > AB. [2] Our studies are in agreement with respect to ABO and Rh systems with the general formula B > O > A > AB, in a previous study conducted in the Banjara backward caste of Maharashtra. [3] Jaff [1] reported that the most prevalent blood group was O (37.16%) and the least prevalent was AB (6.53%) and the majority were Rh positive (91.73%) in the Kurdish ethnic group of Iraq. [1] These differences with the present study may be due to different geographical locations different ethnicities.

The present study showed that there was a real preponderance of the blood group B over the blood groups O, A and specially AB as well as Rh(D) positive over Rh(D) negative.


  Acknowledgments Top


The authors would like to acknowledge the laboratory staff of the Pathology department of the Bankura Sammilani Medical College and Hospital, Bankura, for assisting in sample collections and laboratory analysis.

 
  References Top

1.Jaff MS. ABO and rhesus blood group distribution in Kurds. J Blood Med 2010;1:143-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]    
2.Dar NJ, Srivastava A, Dar FA. Distribution of ABO blood groups and Rh(D) factor among the Brahmin and Kushwaha populations of Jhansi District(U.P). Nature Precedings 2011; hdl:10.1038/npre.6362.1.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Pawar ACS, Baig MM. Allelic frequency of ABO and Rh D blood group among the Banjara backward caste of Yavatmal District, Maharashtra, India. Nature Precedings 2010; hdl:10101/npre.5482.1.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Datta UK, Mondal S, Mukherjee S. A study of the distribution of ABO and Rh(D) blood groups amongst Lodha tribe in Midnapore district of West Bengal. J Indian Med Assoc 1997;95:497-506.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.Risley HH. Tribes and Caste of Bengal. Vol. I and II. (Reprint Vol. 1998). Kolkata: Firma KLM Ltd;1891.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.Dacie JV, Lewis SM. Practical Haematology. In: Lewis SM, Bain BJ, Bates I, editors. 9 th ed. London: Churchill Livingstone, Harcourt Publishers Limited; 2001. p. 444-51.  Back to cited text no. 6
    



 
 
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