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SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 200-203

The serum protein carbonyl content level in relation to exercise stress test


1 Department of Cardiao-Thoracic, Biomedical Research Unit in Cardiovascular Sciences (BRUCS), Faculty of Allied Health Sciences; Department of Cardiao-Thoracic Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand
2 Department of Cardiao-Thoracic, Biomedical Research Unit in Cardiovascular Sciences (BRUCS), Faculty of Allied Health Sciences; Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand
3 Department of Medicine, Buddhachinaraj Hospital, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand
4 Department of Cardiao-Thoracic, Biomedical Research Unit in Cardiovascular Sciences (BRUCS), Faculty of Allied Health Sciences; Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Sarawut Kumphune
Biomedical Research Unit in Cardiovascular Sciences (BRUCS) and Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok
Thailand
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Source of Support: Naresuan University, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2278-344X.105089

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Background: Protein carbonyl (P) is oxidatively-modified protein with diagnostic potential for acute myocardial infarction. However, many findings indicated the elevation of serum PC content level related to exercise, which could cause false positive results and limiting the specificity for acute coronary syndrome diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the level of serum protein carbonyl content in healthy volunteers subjected to exercise stress test (EST). Materials and Methods: Serum from healthy volunteers was collected 5-10 min before performing EST and 1 hour after the EST was achieved. The serum was collected, and the serum PC content level was determined by spectrophotometric DNPH assay. Results: The serum PC content level after exercise stress test was significantly higher than that of before performing EST (0.373 ± 0.05 nM/mg vs. 0.275 ± 0.02 nM/mg, P < 0.0001). The results demonstrated that in both male and female, serum PC content level after EST was significantly higher than that of before performing EST (0.29 ± 0.03 nM/mg vs. 0.36 ± 0.05 nM/mg P < 0.0001 in male, 0.27 ± 0.02 nM/mg vs. 0.38 ± 0.06 nM/mg P < 0.0001 in female, respectively). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that exercise stress test could result in non-specificity and false positive increasing in serum PC content level in healthy subjects, which may cause misinterpretation when using PC as cardiac marker, especially in patients, who underwent exercise stress test or patients who performing heavy physical activities.


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