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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 176-184

Reporting of "death and bereavement care": A systematic review and quantitative analysis of research publications in palliative care journals


1 Adjunct Professor, Srinivas College of Physiotherapy and Research Centre, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Post-Graduate Student, Srinivas College of Physiotherapy and Research Centre, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Senthil P Kumar
Adjunct professor, Srinivas College of Physiotherapy and Research Centre, Mangalore - 575 001, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2278-344X.120586

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Context: The most common concern among terminally ill patients in palliative care is death, which is often perceived as a psychosocial stigma. The knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and experiences regarding death influence both the delivery of palliative care and its outcomes. Aims: This study was conducted with an aim to perform a quantitative analysis of research publications in palliative care journals for articles on death and bereavement care (DBC). Settings and Design: Systematic review of palliative care journals. Materials and Methods: Twelve palliative care journals were searched for articles related to "death" in the title of the articles published in 2009 and 2010. The reporting rates of all journals were compared. The selected articles were categorized into practice, education, research, and administration, and subsequently grouped into original and review articles. The original articles were subgrouped into qualitative and quantitative studies, and the review articles were grouped into narrative and systematic reviews. Each subgroup of original articles category was further classified according to study designs. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive analysis using frequencies and percentiles was done using SPSS for Windows version 11.5. Results: The overall reporting rate among all journals was 5.27% (96/1821), and Palliat Support Care had the highest reporting rate of 14.4% (17/118), followed by BMC Palliat Care with 9.3% (4/43) and Palliat Med with 7.4% (16/216). Conclusions: The overall reporting rate for DBC articles in palliative care journals was very low, and very few randomized clinical trials and systematic reviews were found. The study findings indicate a lack of adequate evidence base for DBC.


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