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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 245-246

World health organization emphasizes for the development of the priority list of medical devices for the management of cancers


Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication12-Dec-2017

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
3rd Floor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Ammapettai, Thiruporur, Guduvancherry Main Road, Sembakkam Post, Kancheepuram . 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijhas.IJHAS_90_17

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. World health organization emphasizes for the development of the priority list of medical devices for the management of cancers. Int J Health Allied Sci 2017;6:245-6

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. World health organization emphasizes for the development of the priority list of medical devices for the management of cancers. Int J Health Allied Sci [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Aug 22];6:245-6. Available from: http://www.ijhas.in/text.asp?2017/6/4/245/220527



Dear Editor,

Globally, cancers have been acknowledged as one of the major public health concerns with close to 14 million new cases and more than 8 million associated deaths being reported in 2012.[1],[2] Further, it has been estimated that more than 32 million people are living with some form of cancer, and if urgent interventions are not taken, a more than 50% rise in the new cases is anticipated by the end of 2030.[1] Furthermore, in excess of two-thirds of the reported cancer-related deaths are from low- and middle-income nations while cancer remains the second leading reason for deaths in developed nations.[1]

The role of medical devices in health-care delivery is indispensable and proven beyond any doubts.[1] Even with regard to the management of cancers, medical devices have a significant role in the prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, palliative care, monitoring, and terminal care.[1],[2],[3] However, equity in the field of public health and the attainment of the universal health coverage are determined by the easy access to essential, safe, quality assured, inexpensive, and effective medical technologies.[1] There are no doubts that early detection and prompt treatment of cancer can avert millions of deaths, but due to the lack of technologies to screen, diagnose, or treat, many deaths have been reported in low-resource settings.[1],[2]

Even though surgery and radiotherapy account for curability in close to 50% and 40% of the cancer patients, most of these technologies are inaccessible to people living in the developing nations.[1] After considering all these facts, the World Health Organization has developed a list of essential medical devices (viz., vaccination, clinical assessment and endoscopy; medical imaging and nuclear medicine; surgery; clinical laboratory and pathology; radiotherapy; systemic therapy; and palliative care and end of life care), which can be used in the management of six common types of cancers.[1] In addition, emphasis has also been given to other health system components such as infrastructure, human resources, and quality management requirements.[1]

Furthermore, guidelines have been released to assist the nation in the development of an implementation plan based on the nation-specific needs, epidemiological attributes, availability of infrastructure/human resources/monetary support, and affordability by the general population.[1],[2] However, in order to select the essential medical devices and use them, it is essential to conduct a needs assessment of the resources within the nation for cancer management, which then should be followed by the selection of appropriate medical devices, depending on the target population, cancer type, financial allocation, feasibility, institutional challenges, etc.[1] Finally, on approval of a technology for its addition into the health system, due attention should be given toward regulatory clearance; technical specifications; bidding process; importation-related necessities; transportation, insurance, customs, delivery and installation; training of the users by the manufacturer; establishment of a supply chain of consumables; verification of the quality, safety, and performance; and adopted methods of waste management.[1]

To conclude, the availability and accessibility to quality-assured medical devices play a crucial role in the management of different types of cancer. However, owing to the lack of access to such devices, most of the patients are diagnosed in advanced stages, and thus, there is an indispensable need for each nation to develop their priority list of devices and utilize the same for the detection and management of different cancers.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
World Health Organization. WHO List of Priority Medical Devices for Cancer Management. Geneva: WHO Press; 2017. p. 1-24.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Occupational cancer: Public health interventions to minimize its burden and impact on the society. Iran J Cancer Prev 2014;7:111-3.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Exploring the psychosocial and financial impact of cancer on caretakers. Clin Cancer Investig J 2015;4:590-1.  Back to cited text no. 3
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