Home Print this page Email this page
Users Online: 353
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 45-50

Knowledge, awareness, and practices regarding needlestick injury among health-care workers in a tertiary care hospital of India: Annual incidence versus reporting rate


1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College and Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College and Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Manazir Athar
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh - 202 002, Uttar Pradesh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijhas.IJHAS_88_19

Rights and Permissions

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and awareness regarding needlestick injury (NSI) among health-care workers (HCWs) in a tertiary care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted among HCWs of a tertiary care hospital, India. A predesigned closed-end questionnaire, which assessed knowledge and awareness about NSI, immunization status, and management of NSI, was the tool of data collection. RESULTS: A total of 104 HCWs participated in the study. The annual incidence of NSI was 29.80% (n = 104), whereas only 35.48% (n = 31) of these NSI cases or 10.58% (n = 104) of total HCWs reported to the concerned authority. The causes of underreporting were ignorance about contacting authority (70%), busy schedule (15%), and nonsignificant (10%). Recapping was considered as the most common cause of NSI in 31.7% followed by “haste” in 28.8%. All the HCWs received vaccination against hepatitis B; however, only 71.2% got 3 doses and booster, but only 60% knew about their protective antibody level. Unprotected sexual contact and sharp injury were known to all as the route of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission, whereas blood transfusion as a source of HIV was known to 98%. CONCLUSION: The knowledge of health-care professionals on NSIs and their preventive measures is adequate; however, training on the universal precautions guidelines and the use of safe devices has to be delivered to prevent such injuries. The importance of timely reporting and following protocols regarding postexposure prophylaxis needs emphasis. There is an urgent need for re-strengthening and expanding our knowledge of HIV transmission routes in the hospital. Awareness and importance of hepatitis B immunization status need more attention.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed161    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded43    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal