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SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 198-199

Employing Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation Model for the implementation of programmatic assessment in medical education delivery system in India


1 Department of Community Medicine, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission21-Jan-2020
Date of Decision23-Jan-2020
Date of Acceptance25-Jan-2020
Date of Web Publication9-Apr-2020

Correspondence Address:
Prateek Saurabh Shrivastava
Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) . Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu - 603108
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijhas.IJHAS_11_20

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  Abstract 


The use of formative assessments in the delivery of medical education is not very common in Indian settings. In-fact, it won't be wrong to state that undue importance has been given to summative assessments, with most of the assessments targeting only cognitive domain and very less emphasis on psychomotor, affective or communication domain. The best approach to make all these essential things a reality is via resorting to programmatic assessment. This approach optimizes the process of certification of any medical student and can play an immense role in accomplishing the vision of the medical education delivery system in India. In-fact, one of the most promising ways will be to consider the planning and implementation by means of adoption of ADDIE's (viz. Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation) 5-steps model. In conclusion, programmatic assessment is the need of the hour and employment of ADDIE model can significantly enhance the process of implementation of the same in the medical education delivery system in India.

Keywords: India, medical education, programmatic assessment


How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Employing Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation Model for the implementation of programmatic assessment in medical education delivery system in India. Int J Health Allied Sci 2020;9:198-9

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Employing Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation Model for the implementation of programmatic assessment in medical education delivery system in India. Int J Health Allied Sci [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Jun 1];9:198-9. Available from: http://www.ijhas.in/text.asp?2020/9/2/198/282128




  Introduction Top


The use of formative assessments in the delivery of medical education is not very common in Indian settings.[1] In fact, it won't be wrong to state that undue importance has been given to summative assessments, with most of the assessments targeting only cognitive domain, and very less emphasis has been laid on psychomotor, affective, or communication domain. In terms of skill acquisition as per the Miller's pyramid, the major focus is on knows and know-how areas, whereas the shows and does areas have been predominantly not assessed at all. This aspect of medical education in India needs extensive improvement as we are targeting for a competent medical graduate who possesses all the skills and values to be globally relevant.


  Ground Reality Top


However, considering that most of the skills have not been assessed in the entire undergraduation period, the vision looks far from being achieved. It is quite obvious that not all essential skills can be assessed in summative assessments (due to feasibility issue and time constraints), and there emerges the significant role/scope of formative assessments, which gives students multiple number of opportunities to perform the essential skills, receive feedback, and then further enhance their learning and professional growth. The best approach to make all these essential things a reality is via resorting to programmatic assessment.[1],[2],[3] Apart from neutralizing the various limitations attributed to traditional assessments, programmatic assessment makes the entire process holistic, valid, and reliable and encourages assessment of all levels of the Miller's pyramid.[1],[3]


  Programmatic Assessment Top


Obviously, students get opportunity to improve over the duration of course and no high-stakes decisions are taken based on a single summative assessment; instead, it happens on the basis of a cumulative analysis of all the formative and informal assessments. This approach optimizes the process of certification of any medical student and can play an immense role in accomplishing the vision of the medical education delivery system in India.[1],[4] Even though the road ahead is challenging, the adoption of a systematic approach can easily enable the introduction of programmatic assessment in India. In fact, one of the most promising ways will be to consider the planning and implementation by means of adoption of the Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation (ADDIE's) 5-step model [Table 1].
Table 1: Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation Model and programmatic assessment

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  Conclusion Top


In conclusion, programmatic assessment is the need of the hour, and employment of the ADDIE model can significantly enhance the process of implementation of the same in the medical education delivery system in India.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Rationale for programmatic assessment in medical education and overcoming the anticipated challenges during its implementation. MAMC J Med Sci 2019;5:39-40.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Cleveland LM, McCabe TM, Olimpo JT. A call for programmatic assessment of undergraduate students' conceptual understanding and higher-order cognitive skills. J Microbiol Biol Educ 2018;19:19.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Resorting to programmatic assessment in medical education system in India. Muller J Med Sci Res 2018;9:110-1.  Back to cited text no. 3
  [Full text]  
4.
Perry M, Linn A, Munzer BW, Hopson L, Amlong A, Cole M, et al. Programmatic assessment in emergency medicine: Implementation of best practices. J Grad Med Educ 2018;10:84-90.  Back to cited text no. 4
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1]



 

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Abstract
Introduction
Ground Reality
Programmatic Ass...
Conclusion
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