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 Table of Contents  
LETTERS TO EDITOR
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 200-201

Faculty development programs in medical education


1 Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission04-Jan-2020
Date of Decision05-Jan-2020
Date of Acceptance05-Jan-2020
Date of Web Publication9-Apr-2020

Correspondence Address:
Prateek Saurabh Shrivastava
Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) . Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu - 603 108
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijhas.IJHAS_127_19

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Faculty development programs in medical education. Int J Health Allied Sci 2020;9:200-1

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Faculty development programs in medical education. Int J Health Allied Sci [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 May 30];9:200-1. Available from: http://www.ijhas.in/text.asp?2020/9/2/200/282132



Sir,

In the various fields of teaching, a professional has to undergo training before they can be enrolled as a qualified teacher.[1] However, this general phenomenon does not apply in the medical profession; as the moment a doctor clears his/her postgraduation examination, he/she are eligible to become a teacher the very next day.[1] This does not do justice to their teaching responsibilities as they are not trained enough to teach the future medical doctors.[2] At the same time, it is of no use to teach outdated information to the future doctors as the information will be irrelevant.[1],[2]

It is high time that arrangements should be made to train all doctors joining medical college as a fresh faculty, and they should be trained within 3–6 months of first recruitment. In fact, in the medical colleges, faculty members were initially appointed with the basic purpose of their knowledge and skills and not for their teaching abilities.[3] However, gradually, it has been realized that all the faculty members should be trained in teaching and learning strategies so that they can meet the needs and demands of the everchanging healthcare delivery system.[3] In fact, amid the major reforms in the information technology (with ubiquitous presence and use of internet), lawsuits, and commercialization, the expectations of the society have changed big time.[2],[3]

It will not be wrong to admit that in the current era, the general population does not want a doctor to be medical experts alone, but a doctor has to be a good communicator, possess leadership skills, and be professional as well.[3] Considering all the above facts, there is a need for major reforms in the field of medical education, and one of the best ways to ensure the same is through conduction of faculty development programs (FDPs).[1],[2],[3] These FDPs can help the faculty members to realize their accountability and thus play a significant role in improving the quality of medical education.[3]

FDPs are a must in all the medical colleges and are often sought by different accreditation agencies.[2],[3] Some of the state medical councils in India (viz., Maharashtra Medical Council, Tamil Nadu Medical Council) have made it mandatory for the graduates from their state to undergo a specified number of FDPs (measured in terms of credit points) for their renewal of registration after about the appropriate methodology for evaluation, frequency, and logistics which will be employed.[2],[4] Even though many methods have been employed, the Kirkpatrick method for evaluation is widely used in the field of medical education.[5] Subsequently, the process of piloting has to be done and based on the inputs received, the process has to be finally implemented.[2],[3] Further, the result of the evaluation has to be shared with all the involved stakeholders for enabling a better remedial action and all the records should be maintained for reference and future research.[2],[3],[4]

In conclusion, evaluation of feedback has to be a continuous process and the criteria for the same have to be explicitly defined for better planning and corrective measures based on the obtained results.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Faculty development program: A boost in medical education. Res Dev Med Educ 2013;2:1-2.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Morris C, Swanwick T. From the workshop to the workplace: Relocating faculty development in postgraduate medical education. Med Teach 2018;40:622-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Bin Abdulrahman KA, Siddiqui IA, Aldaham SA, Akram S. Faculty development program: a guide for medical schools in Arabian Gulf (GCC) countries. Med Teach 2012;34 Suppl 1:S61-6.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Manzoor I, Zeeshan S, Iqbal A, Sarfraz F. Needs assessment for establishing faculty development program in a private medical college at Lahore. J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad 2018;30:539-43.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Lupi CS, Ownby AR, Jokela JA, Cutrer WB, Thompson-Busch AK, Catallozzi M, et al. Faculty development revisited: A systems-based view of stakeholder development to meet the demands of entrustable professional activity implementation. Acad Med 2018;93:1472-9.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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