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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 145-151

Drivers, barriers, benefits, and perceived dangers of the use of COVID-19 biosecurity protective items in a medically challenged environment of a rural hospital in Eastern Nigeria


1 Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Abia State; Department of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Rhema University, Aba, Nigeria
2 Department of Health Administration and Management, University of Nigeria; Department of Health Services, AIICO Multishield Ltd, Enugu, Nigeria
3 Department of Family Medicine, Alex Ekwueme Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, Abakaliki; Department of Family Medicine, Alex Ekwueme University, Ndifu Alike, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
4 Department of Family Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi; Department of Family Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Nigeria
5 Department of Public Health, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr Gabriel Uche Iloh
Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Abia State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijhas.IJHAS_151_20

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INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus has infected and affected millions of life across the globe. As the burden of COVID-19 continues to rise, compliance with the use of COVID-19 biosecurity protective items by the public is critical in safeguarding interperson transmissions of the virus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A descriptive study was carried out from April to May 2020 on a cross-section of 400 adult Nigerians in a rural hospital in eastern Nigeria. Data collection was done using structured, pretested, and researcher-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire elicited information on drivers, barriers, benefits, and perceived dangers of the use of biosecurity protective items (face masks and alcohol-based hand sanitizers). RESULTS: The study participants were aged 18–84 years with a mean age of 53 ± 11.6 years. There were 214 (53.5%) females. The most common driver of use of COVID-19 biosecurity protective items was government public health legislative directives (400/400) (100.0%). The most common barrier was a denial of the existence of COVID-19 (359/400) (89.8%). The most common benefits were protection from contracting COVID-19 (400/400) (100.0%) and prevent spreading the infection to others (400/400) (100.0%). The most commonly perceived dangers were suffocation (400/400) (100.0%) and hand irritation (377/400) (94.3%) for face masks and hand sanitizers, respectively. CONCLUSION: The most common driver was government public health legislative directives. The most common barrier was a denial of the existence of COVID-19, while the predominant benefits were protection from contracting COVID-19 and prevent spreading the infection to others. The most commonly perceived dangers were suffocation and hand irritation for masks and sanitizers, respectively. There is a need to address the factors that constitute barriers and perceived dangers to the use of COVID-19 biosecurity items. Factors that drive the use of COVID-19 biosecurity items should be the focus of interest to contain the spread of COVID-19.


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